Il 27 marzo 2018 alle ore 12.00 in aula Libera il prof Radolph Langenbach terra’ una conferenza dal titolo:

Timber Frames and Solid Walls: Earthquake Resilient Construction from Roman Times to the Origins of the Modern Skyscraper

A seguire ore 13.00-14.00 un film su Roma vista da Randolph Langenbach (il trailer su www.piranesian.com)

This lecture will explore what can be learned from the earthquake performance of simple, unsophisticated, historical non-engineered timber and masonry construction that resists earthquakes compared to that of modern reinforced concrete frame buildings of varying construction quality that are common in much of the world’s seismically active areas. Examples will be drawn from around the world, including Italy, Portugal, Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, India, Nepal and the United States, as well as other countries. The talk will also briefly discuss how the practice of structural engineering has changed since the invention of steel (and, later, reinforced concrete) “skyscrapers” with skeleton frames, rather than solid masonry walls, with focus on how the first generation of these structures, with their heavy stone and brick facades, performed in the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake.
Reference Papers:
1) What We Learn from Vernacular Construction: Chapter 1 in: K.A. Harries & B. Sharma, editors; Nonconventional and Vernacular Construction Materials, Characterisation, Properties and Applications, Woodhead Publishing Series in Civil and Structural Engineering, No. 58, Elsevier, London, 2016, pp 3-36
2) Timber Frames and Solid Walls: Earthquake Resilient Construction from Roman Times to the Origins of the Modern Skyscraper, 1st International Symposium on Historic Earthquake-Resistant Timber Frames in The Mediterranean Area
3) “SAGA OF THE HALF-TIMBERED SKYSCRAPER: What Does Half-Timbered Construction have to do with the Chicago Frame,” Proceedings of the Second International Congress on Construction History, Cambridge University, UK, 2006

  • Conferenza di Radolph Langenbach
  • 27.03.2018
  • ore 12.00
    aula Libera
    Dipartimento di Architettura
    Largo G.B. Marzi, 10
    Roma